close message

GET PATIENTS STARTED AT NO CHARGE

Some exclusions apply.

FIRDAPSE® EFFICACY

Significant symptom reduction for your adult patients with LEMS

IMPACT ON MUSCLE STRENGTH*

Based on Quantitative Myasthenia Gravis (QMG) scores, in two separate Phase 3 randomized withdrawal studies, FIRDAPSE-treated subjects were able to maintain their muscle strength, while placebo-treated subjects demonstrated statistically significant decline in muscle strength.3,13†

QMG-Study1
QMG-Study2

IMPACT ON PATIENT-REPORTED WELL-BEING

Based on Subject Global Impression (SGI) scores, in two separate Phase 3 randomized withdrawal studies, FIRDAPSE-treated subjects reported better sense of well-being compared to placebo-treated subjects.3,13‡

SGI-Study1
SGI-Study2

Outcomes with SGI scores were consistent with scores observed with QMG testing.

*The nature of LEMS makes it difficult to conduct parallel‑group, placebo‑controlled trials that require patients to be exposed to placebo for prolonged periods of time. For this reason, controlled trials of FIRDAPSE in LEMS patients were conducted as discontinuation studies, in which all patients received FIRDAPSE at baseline. The efficacy of FIRDAPSE for the treatment of LEMS was demonstrated in two randomized, double‑blind, placebo‑controlled, discontinuation studies. A total of 64 adults (aged 21 to 88 years) with LEMS were enrolled (Study 1 and Study 2). The studies enrolled patients with a confirmed diagnosis of LEMS based on either neurophysiology studies or a positive anti‑P/Q-type voltage‑gated calcium channel and body test. Patients were required to be on an adequate and stable dosage (30 to 80 mg daily) of amifampridine phosphate prior to entering the randomized discontinuation phases of both studies.3,13

Coprimary endpoints

The change from baseline (Day 0) to the end of the discontinuation period in the Quantitative Myasthenia Gravis (QMG) score and in the Subject Global Impression (SGI) score.

The QMG is a 13‑item physician‑rated categorical scale assessing muscle weakness. Each item is assessed on a 4‑point scale, where a score of 0 represents no weakness, and a score of 3 represents severe weakness (total score ranges from 0‑39). Higher scores represent greater impairment.13

The SGI is a 7‑point scale on which patients rated their global impression of the effects of the study treatment on their physical well‑being. Lower scores on the SGI represent lower perceived benefit with the study treatment. The 7‑point SGI scale: 1=terrible; 2=mostly dissatisfied; 3=mixed; 4=partially satisfied; 5=mostly satisfied; 6=pleased; 7=delighted.13

phone

Request a Rep

Request to be contacted by a FIRDAPSE Representative.
hands

Learn About Support

See how our comprehensive support programs can help you and your patients.

Indication & Important Safety Information

indications and usage:

FIRDAPSE is a potassium channel blocker indicated for the treatment of Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS) in adults.

CONTRAINDICATIONS

FIRDAPSE is contraindicated in patients with:

  • A history of seizures
  • Hypersensitivity to amifampridine phosphate or another aminopyridine

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

Seizures: FIRDAPSE can cause seizures. Consider discontinuation or dose-reduction of FIRDAPSE in patients who have a seizure while on treatment. FIRDAPSE is contraindicated in patients with a history of seizures.

Hypersensitivity: If a hypersensitivity reaction such as anaphylaxis occurs, FIRDAPSE should be discontinued and appropriate therapy initiated.

ADVERSE REACTIONS

The most common (> 10%) adverse reactions are: paresthesia, upper respiratory tract infection, abdominal pain, nausea, diarrhea, headache, elevated liver enzymes, back pain, hypertension, and muscle spasms.

To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contact Catalyst Pharmaceuticals at 1-844-347-3277 (1-844-FIRDAPSE) or FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch.

References:
  1. Lennon VA, Kryzer TJ, Griesmann GE, et al. Calcium-channel antibodies in the Lambert-Eaton syndrome and other paraneoplastic syndromes. N Engl J Med. 1995;332(22):1467-1474.
  2. Skeie GO, Apostolski S, Evoli A, et al. Guidelines for treatment of autoimmune neuromuscular transmission disorders. Eur J Neurol. 2010;17(7):893-902.
  3. Data on file, Catalyst Pharmaceuticals.
  4. Sanders DB. Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome: diagnosis and treatment. Ann NY Acad Sci. 2003;998:500-508
  5. Titulaer MJ, Lang B, Verschuuren JJ. Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome: from clinical characteristics to therapeutic strategies. Lancet Neurol. 2011;10(12):1098-1107.
  6. Merino-Ramírez MÁ, Bolton CF. Review of the diagnostic challenges of Lambert-Eaton syndrome revealed through three case reports. Can J Neurol Sci. 2016;43(5):635-647.
  7. Mantegazza R, Meisel A, Sieb JP, et al. The European LEMS Registry: baseline demographics and treatment approaches. Neurol Ther. 2015;4(2):105-124.
  8. Harms L, Sieb JP, Williams AE, et al. Long-term disease history, clinical symptoms, health status, and healthcare utilization in patients suffering from Lambert Eaton myasthenic syndrome: results of a patient interview survey in Germany. J Med Econ. 2012;15(3):521-530.
  9. Motomura M, Lang B, Johnston I, Palace J, Vincent A, Newsom-Davis J. Incidence of serum anti-P/Q-type and anti-N-type calcium channel autoantibodies in the Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome. J Neurol Sci. 1997;147(1):35-42.
  10. Oh SJ, Sieb JP. Update on amifampridine as a drug of choice in Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome. US J Neurol. 2014;10(2):83-89.
  11. Strupp M, Teufel J, Zwergal A, et al. Aminopyridines for the treatment of neurologic disorders. Neurol Clin Pract. 2017;7(1):65-76.
  12. Lindquist S, Stangel M. Update on treatment options for Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome: focus on use of amifampridine. Neuropsychiatr Dis Treat. 2011;7:341-349.
  13. Full Prescribing Information for FIRDAPSE (amifampridine). Catalyst Pharma; 2018.
  14. Oh SJ, Shcherbakova N, Kostera-Pruszczyk A, et al; LEMS Study Group. Amifampridine phosphate (FIRDAPSE®) is effective and safe in a phase 3 clinical trial in LEMS. Muscle Nerve. 2016;53(5):717-725.

Indication & Important Safety Information

indications and usage:

FIRDAPSE is a potassium channel blocker indicated for the treatment of Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS) in adults.

CONTRAINDICATIONS

FIRDAPSE is contraindicated in patients with:

  • A history of seizures
  • Hypersensitivity to amifampridine phosphate or another aminopyridine

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

Seizures: FIRDAPSE can cause seizures. Consider discontinuation or dose-reduction of FIRDAPSE in patients who have a seizure while on treatment. FIRDAPSE is contraindicated in patients with a history of seizures.

Hypersensitivity: If a hypersensitivity reaction such as anaphylaxis occurs, FIRDAPSE should be discontinued and appropriate therapy initiated.

ADVERSE REACTIONS

The most common (> 10%) adverse reactions are: paresthesia, upper respiratory tract infection, abdominal pain, nausea, diarrhea, headache, elevated liver enzymes, back pain, hypertension, and muscle spasms.

To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contact Catalyst Pharmaceuticals at 1-844-347-3277 (1-844-FIRDAPSE) or FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch.

References:
  1. Lennon VA, Kryzer TJ, Griesmann GE, et al. Calcium-channel antibodies in the Lambert-Eaton syndrome and other paraneoplastic syndromes. N Engl J Med. 1995;332(22):1467-1474.
  2. Skeie GO, Apostolski S, Evoli A, et al. Guidelines for treatment of autoimmune neuromuscular transmission disorders. Eur J Neurol. 2010;17(7):893-902.
  3. Data on file, Catalyst Pharmaceuticals.
  4. Sanders DB. Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome: diagnosis and treatment. Ann NY Acad Sci. 2003;998:500-508
  5. Titulaer MJ, Lang B, Verschuuren JJ. Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome: from clinical characteristics to therapeutic strategies. Lancet Neurol. 2011;10(12):1098-1107.
  6. Merino-Ramírez MÁ, Bolton CF. Review of the diagnostic challenges of Lambert-Eaton syndrome revealed through three case reports. Can J Neurol Sci. 2016;43(5):635-647.
  7. Mantegazza R, Meisel A, Sieb JP, et al. The European LEMS Registry: baseline demographics and treatment approaches. Neurol Ther. 2015;4(2):105-124.
  8. Harms L, Sieb JP, Williams AE, et al. Long-term disease history, clinical symptoms, health status, and healthcare utilization in patients suffering from Lambert Eaton myasthenic syndrome: results of a patient interview survey in Germany. J Med Econ. 2012;15(3):521-530.
  9. Motomura M, Lang B, Johnston I, Palace J, Vincent A, Newsom-Davis J. Incidence of serum anti-P/Q-type and anti-N-type calcium channel autoantibodies in the Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome. J Neurol Sci. 1997;147(1):35-42.
  10. Oh SJ, Sieb JP. Update on amifampridine as a drug of choice in Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome. US J Neurol. 2014;10(2):83-89.
  11. Strupp M, Teufel J, Zwergal A, et al. Aminopyridines for the treatment of neurologic disorders. Neurol Clin Pract. 2017;7(1):65-76.
  12. Lindquist S, Stangel M. Update on treatment options for Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome: focus on use of amifampridine. Neuropsychiatr Dis Treat. 2011;7:341-349.
  13. Full Prescribing Information for FIRDAPSE (amifampridine). Catalyst Pharma; 2018.
  14. Oh SJ, Shcherbakova N, Kostera-Pruszczyk A, et al; LEMS Study Group. Amifampridine phosphate (FIRDAPSE®) is effective and safe in a phase 3 clinical trial in LEMS. Muscle Nerve. 2016;53(5):717-725.